Mystery Science Theater 3000: The Definitive Oral History of a TV Masterpiece

Wired goes long on MST3K:

Though MST3K boasted a remarkably talented writing staff, its real stars were the B movies that were riffed apart in each episode. The series would skewer all manner of films, from cheapo action flicks like The Pumaman (1980) to drecky sci-fi-­horror amalgams like Night of the Blood Beast (1958) to creepy kids’ fare like Merlin’s Shop of Mystical Wonders (1996).

Hodgson: Film distributors would do this trick where they’d license you several movies. Half of them might be movies you’d heard of, and half were the movies we actually wanted, the B movies. We didn’t want the cocaine—we wanted the baby laxative they put in the cocaine.

Louis C.K. Is America's Undisputed King of Comedy

GQ:

When it comes to his own jokes, C.K. is proudest of those for which he must commit with Method-actor rigor to some rhetorical or moral absurdity—and then take his argument several parsecs beyond its "logical" conclusion. He's always striking through the mask, Louis C.K. It's not just a matter of braying aloud what the rest of us only dare to think; he says things we aren't even aware we're thinking until we hear them from C.K. That's his genius. 

 

How I Paid My Bitcoin Taxes

Kashmir Hill:

My record-keeping made my accountant’s job much easier, but there were multiple entries as we calculated my gains and losses on each day of spending. Like the day I spent .59 BTC or $56 on mini-cupcakes: Bitcoin was worth $96 that day; I’d bought it at $125, so I took a $17 capital loss. As I bombarded him with numbers (Bitcoin’s value when I bought it, the date I spent it, how much I spent, and the underlying value at the time), he muttered, “The government’s going to kill Bitcoin by taxing it to death.”

Why Do We Eat, and Why Do We Gain Weight?

An interesting lunchtime read in The New Yorker.

Our bodies don’t have just a single internal clock that tells us when to sleep and when to wake. Each organ—including the organs related to eating—has a circadian clock of its own, and that clock is sensitive to when, precisely, we eat. If two groups consume the same number of calories but one group eats them during the first part of the day and the other during the second, the latter group is up to two times more likely to be obese. In one study, two groups of people were assigned to eat the same number of calories each day during a twelve-week period. One group received more of them during breakfast, and the other had more during dinner. The breakfast group lost significantly more weight.