Category Archives: Economics and Advertising

Product recommendations

Hello. I have two product recommendations for you. I’m using Amazon affiliate links so please be aware that I stand to make just a crazy amount of money off of this, assuming someone clicks through and buys, like a jet. Anyway, here are two items that have made my life better.

  1. This “rug pad” is probably really great at keeping your rug in place. I don’t know. What I do know is that it is really great at keeping your dumb sofa cushions in place. I spent about 5 years marginally annoyed at having to shift my cushions back in place every single day. Now they just stay where they’re supposed to be.
  2. This “package opener” has a little box cutter blade that you can use to open all of your Amazon packages (like the one containing your new rug pad) and then quickly break them down so you don’t have piles of empty cardboard boxes lying around. Instead, you’ll have piles of empty cardboard boxes that you have broken down so they take up less space lying around. It’s better.

 

I Have a Problem | Bread Furst

A perfectly reasonable argument from Mark Furstenberg makes clear that there are some places where you can get coffee that are not suitable for long stays:

I do want a third space but one that is community and I’m not at all interested in a place where unassociated people sit with their computers in physical proximity that has nothing to do with relationships. In fact their computers and telephones isolate them in those spaces.  I see that and don’t think I am providing anything more than a chair and table and a cup.

Source: I Have a Problem | Bread Furst

The Winter of Weird Al [link]

Steven Hyden, for Grantland:

In the past, Weird Al’s timing was perhaps his greatest asset. Right when the culture seemed to be tiring of a particular song or artist, the Weird Al parody would appear. It was the sign of an artist reaching “we love you, but we also can’t stand you” stardom. But that timing now seems rather, well, sluggish, and this has caused Weird Al to drift back into a crowded field. Now that the release of Mandatory Fun completes Yankovic’s record contract, it seems wise to explore more expedient alternatives.

When I asked Yankovic if it still made sense for him to make albums in the future, he was eager to steer the conversation back to the record he had already made and was trying to promote. But in spite of the hemming and hawing, he was pretty clear about what’s next.

“I don’t want to draw any hard lines in the sand, because I’d like to leave all my options open, but I’m feeling like this is probably my last conventional album,” he said.

I think it was Richard Nixon who said “if you’ve lost Weird Al, you’ve lost the traditional music sales model.”

Marc Andreessen and the Inevitability of Catastrophic Ideas [link]

Great post by Maria Bustillos examining the general proposition that a rising tech tide raises all boats (hint: nope). Goes well with this piece in the New York Times asking why we’re all so eager to buy stuff that just makes us want to buy more stuff.

How I Paid My Bitcoin Taxes

Kashmir Hill:

My record-keeping made my accountant’s job much easier, but there were multiple entries as we calculated my gains and losses on each day of spending. Like the day I spent .59 BTC or $56 on mini-cupcakes: Bitcoin was worth $96 that day; I’d bought it at $125, so I took a $17 capital loss. As I bombarded him with numbers (Bitcoin’s value when I bought it, the date I spent it, how much I spent, and the underlying value at the time), he muttered, “The government’s going to kill Bitcoin by taxing it to death.”

Mattel’s 3-Year Quest To Make A Better Toy Gun | Co.Design | business + design

Seems like every year there’s a new story about the incredible innovation going on in the toy world (usually about Nerf). Well, here’s the latest incarnation (and it’s not about Nerf, technically!).